Gary Valle's Photography on the Run
Images taken on trail runs, and other adventures, in the Open Space and Wilderness areas of California, and beyond. All content, including photography, is Copyright © 2006-2012 Gary Valle. All Rights Reserved.
# Friday, August 01, 2014

Sitting on the bench at Inspiration Point, I gazed across mile deep Vincent Gulch to the towering northeast face of Mt. Baden-Powell. My eye traced the peak's right-hand skyline from near Vincent Gap up, up and to a small step just below Baden-Powell's summit. At that small step, marked by a gnarled and ancient Limber pine, was the 9,225' high point of the Angeles Crest 100 course.

Tomorrow about 140 of us would pass this bench, descend to Vincent Gap, and then climb the switchbacks of Mt. Baden-Powell to that tree. Over the course of 100 miles, those that finished the AC100 would ascend the equivalent of nearly eight Mt. Baden-Powells and would descend the equivalent of around ten -- a daunting task by any standard.

During this year's AC100 training runs a question that has inevitable come up is "How many times have your run AC?" When I've responded that the AC100 would be my first attempt at running 100 miles the reaction has often been one of polite surprise and concern. Why at age 66 -- or any age -- would I choose such a challenging event as my first 100?

The answer is a simple one. My goal isn't to run a 100 miles. If that were the goal I'm pretty sure I could pick an event with a less demanding course and click off the miles. My goal is to become fully enveloped in the experience of running 100 miles through a mountain range that I have enjoyed for more than 40 years.

Over that time I've run, hiked, climbed, skied, and kayaked the San Gabriel Mountains. I've soared above its peaks in a hang glider. I've worked on its trails. On every visit I try to learn more about its flora, fauna, geology and weather. Photography from its peaks and within its canyons is a passion.

This year my dream of running the AC100 ended at Newcomb Saddle. I could not have had better conditions for running the race or a better crew or pacers. Quads and mind blown, I felt I couldn't continue. After sleeping an hour at Newcomb, and with the help of my pacer, I was able to hobble down to Chantry Flat.

It is one thing to know something intellectually and quite another to know it from personal experience. It was amazing and humbling. I learned a lot, and look forward to participating in the event again next year.

Many thanks to Hal Winton, Ken Hamada and everyone that helped to make the event happen. And a special thanks to the aid station personnel at Newcomb Saddle that did their best to get me moving before the cutoff!

Some related posts: Crest of the Angeles, Mid January Trail Run from Islip Saddle to Mt. Baden-Powell, Mt. Wilson - Newcomb Pass - Chantry Flat Loop

Friday, August 01, 2014 3:27:29 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #   
# Sunday, July 13, 2014

North face Strawberry Peak

After being closed 4 1/2 years because of the 2009 Station Fire, Strawberry Peak and the trails comprising the Strawberry Peak loop reopened on May 25, 2014. Today, I finally got a chance to get back on the 15+ mile circuit around Strawberry, and was excited to find that much of it was in better shape than before fire.

I'd heard that COBRA was instrumental in the restoration of the loop, but that is only part of the story. The preservation and maintenance of trails is now largely a community effort -- in this case CORBA, Mount Wilson Bicycling Association, Sierra Club, Los Angeles Conservation Corps, National Forest Foundation, REI, Bellfree Contractors, and the BSA all contributed to the effort. See the post Strawberry Peak Restoration Update on the COBRA web site for additional details.

The loop, which was part of the Mt. Disappointment 50K from 2005 to 2009, circumnavigates Strawberry Peak. The trails that comprise the loop are Josephine Fire Road, Strawberry Spur Trail, Colby Canyon Trail, Strawberry Peak Trail, Gabrielino Trail, and Nature's Canteen Trail. The loop can be started at Red Box, Switzer's or Clear Creek. I usually start it at Clear Creek so I can refill my hydration pack from the water faucet at the Haramokngna American Indian Cultural Center at Red Box. (Note: Water might not be available here, especially in winter!)

Some things to note. The Colby Canyon Trail and the use trail up Strawberry Peak are somewhat hidden from view when you first get to Josephine Saddle. The trails are on the east side of the saddle, and well used. The Gabrielino Trail between Red Box and Switzer's Picnic area is generally in good shape, but watch out for Poodle-dog bush. The start of Nature's Canteen Trail is not currently marked. It can be picked up near the top of the paved road that climbs up from Switzer's, near the telephone/power line poles. It starts on the west side of the road. Most of the trail was overgrown, but it looked like it was being restored, starting at its west end.

I was glad to see that most of the bigcone Douglas-fir on the north side of the peak survived the fire and that Strawberry Potrero was mostly intact. There was a nice set of bear tracks between Strawberry Potrero and the steep section of the Strawberry Peak Trail above the Colby Canyon Trail junction.

Here's an overview of the Strawberry Peak circuit and an interactive Google Earth browser view of the route that can be zoomed, panned, tilted and rotated.

Some related posts: Strawberry Peak Traverse, Blue Skies and Short Sleeves on Strawberry Peak

Sunday, July 13, 2014 8:24:22 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #   
# Saturday, July 12, 2014

Lemon lily along the Three Points - Mt. Waterman Trail. border=0 src=

The bright yellow lemon lilies marked the trail. I hopped up on the log, followed it to it's end, and stepped off. An ill-defined path through thick ferns gradually became more distinct and after a few yards became easier to follow.

I was on the Three Points - Mt. Waterman Trail (10W04) and doing a clockwise circuit of the 20 mile Three Points - Mt. Waterman loop. Counterclockwise because it was a way I could get in some additional training on the Cooper Canyon section of the AC100 course and also check how the south-facing slopes of Mt. Waterman were recovering from the 2009 Station Fire.

The Mt. Waterman Trail is less used than the major trails in the area, such as the PCT and Silver Moccasin Trail.  While it has seen some post-fire maintenance, it has more of the character of a "use trail" -- as it did before the Station Fire. The trail is indistinct at times, winding its way around fallen trees and simply defining its route through use.

Some sections of the Mt. Waterman Trail near Three Points were severely burned. Higher up the mountain the fire made long runs up parallel ravines and ridges, creating a patchwork of burned understory and trees. The chaparral in the severely-burned areas appears to be recovering at a more or less normal rate. Of course the trees will take longer to grow, and it was great to see some pine seedlings and incense cedar seedlings have sprouted in the burn area.

The loop joined the AC100 course at Buckhorn Campground, descending the Burkhart Trail and then following the PCT up Cooper Canyon to Cloudburst Summit. From here it is nearly all downhill to Three Points.

Some related posts: Lemon Lily Along the Burkhart Trail, Three Points Loop Twice, Southern Pacific Rattlesnake on the Burkhart Trail, After the Station Fire: Three Points - Mt. Waterman Loop

Saturday, July 12, 2014 4:48:51 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #   
# Saturday, June 28, 2014

That's Art and Ann just west of the summit of San Gorgonio Mountain, which can be seen behind them. The peak is the highest in Southern California, with a summit elevation of about 11,500'.

The ascent of the peak had gone well. Including a stop a South Fork Meadows to top off our water, and another quick stop to talk to Dan the Ranger, we'd left the car just after 7:00 and made it to the summit about 10:30 am. With the short-sleeves and shorts summer weather and zero chance of thunderstorm, the summit was a busy place.

We were doing a variation of the South Fork - Dollar Lake Trail - Dry Lake Trail keyhole loop. The variation was that instead of descending the Dry Lake Trail from Mine Shaft Saddle, we continued over to Fish Creek Saddle and descended a "use trail" past (dry) Lodgepole Spring, rejoining the Dry Lake Trail at the Dry Lake outlet.

It seems to me that doing the loop counterclockwise -- going up the Dollar Lake Trail -- maximizes the runnability of the route as a whole. With spectacular trails and scenery the route is every bit as enjoyable as a run in the Sierra, and is my favorite route up Gorgonio from the South Fork trailhead.

Some related posts: Dollar Lake - Dry Lake Trail Run, Falls Creek Loop August 2013, San Gorgonio High Line 2009

Saturday, June 28, 2014 2:01:52 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #   
# Saturday, June 21, 2014

Between Vincent Gap and Islip Saddle the Pacific Crest Trail follows one of the most scenic stretches of trail in Southern California, skirting the summit of Mt. Baden-Powell (9399') and passing Mt. Burnham, Throop Peak and Mt. Hawkins before leaving the crest at Windy Gap (7600'), just east of Mt. Islip. It has long been a favorite of hikers and runners.

There are several ways this classic stretch of trail can be incorporated into a run or hike. Today we were doing the segment as part of a training run for the 2014 Angeles Crest 100 Mile Endurance Run. The AC100 starts at Wrightwood, California; then using parts of the PCT, Silver Moccasin, Gabrielino and several other trails, the AC100 works west through the peaks and canyons of the San Gabriel Mountains to Loma Alta Park near JPL.

Saturday, June 21, 2014 8:10:37 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #   
# Sunday, June 01, 2014

Jon Sutherland running at Ahmanson Ranch on day 16,446 of his 45+ year running streak.
Jon running at Ahmanson Ranch on day 16,446 of his 45+ year running streak.

Earlier this week, to the cheers of runners on the Notre Dame High School Cross Country team he coaches, Jon Sutherland broke Mark Covert's U.S. record for the most days run consecutively. Jon's run on Tuesday increased his daily run tally to 16,438 days -- and counting.

It's the "and counting" part that's key. Jon has run on days of major earthquakes, record-setting rain and heat, national catastrophe and personal tragedy. He's run through two knee operations, various strains, sprains and ills and several fractures -- including a hip avulsion fracture.

Today Jon hosted a "Running Rocks!" fun run/walk/hike at Ahmanson Ranch to thank all the people that have been part of his running life. During the celebration Councilmember Tom LaBonge (District 4) presented Jon with a Certificate of Accomplishment on behalf of the City of Los Angeles. Below are a few photos from the get-together.

Jon says he sees no stop sign, and plans to continue running every day. You can check his current count of consecutive days run on the U.S.A. Active Running Streak List.


Certificate Presentation

Jon & Councilmember Tom LaBonge

Running Rocks! T-Shirt

Jon & Runners

Start of the Fun Run

Fun Run at Ahmanson Ranch

Also see: Melissa Block's Interview (NPR: All Things Considered), Eric Sondheimer's article (Los Angeles Times), Lenny Bernstein's article (Washington Post), Scott Douglas' article (Runner's World Running Times)

Related post: Jon Sutherland's 40 Year Running Streak

Sunday, June 01, 2014 11:35:53 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #   
# Friday, May 23, 2014

San Francisco Mornings Five: Sunday Outbound

Friday, May 23, 2014 9:32:33 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #   
# Thursday, May 22, 2014

San Francisco Mornings Four: Bridge Café

Thursday, May 22, 2014 9:29:49 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #   
# Wednesday, May 21, 2014

San Francisco Mornings Three: Golden Gate Bridge

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 9:27:14 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #   
# Tuesday, May 20, 2014

San Francisco Mornings Two: Fishing Pier

Tuesday, May 20, 2014 9:24:27 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #   
# Monday, May 19, 2014

San Francisco Mornings One: Palace of Fine Arts

Monday, May 19, 2014 9:17:24 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #   
# Sunday, May 18, 2014

Running across the Golden Gate Bridge

If you've driven across the Golden Gate Bridge during the afternoon and seen the throngs crowding the sidewalks you might think of running across the Bridge as being akin to game of pedestrian pinball. But there are times when you can have the Bridge nearly to yourself and enjoy a meditative run across this icon of icons.

According to the Golden Gate Bridge web site the east (pedestrian) Sidewalk opens at 5:00 am year around. Starting a couple of miles away I reached the south side of the Bridge at 7:00 am on a Sunday, and even at that late hour there were very few people on the Bridge.

The distance across the bridge from gate to gate is about 1.7 miles. The Coastal Trail can be accessed from the north side of the Bridge, so depending on where you start in San Francisco you could run across the Bridge and then do a nice trail run on the Coastal Trail and only add 3.7 miles (or so) to your total distance.

Sunday, May 18, 2014 2:56:15 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)  #